Bronze Age

Bronze Age

The Bronze Age c. 2500 - 800 BC

Although it is common to generalise late prehistory – and the Bronze Age in particular – as the period which saw the introduction of metallurgy, other important developments took place, including open settlement and field  system patterns. At the same time, many practices continued from the Late Neolithic which preceded it, making it a complex period with cultural change very gradual over time.

Mercers Farm Quarry, Bletchingley Road, Nutfield

Evaluation by W Boismier and I Meadows of Andrew Josephs Associates across an area of possible flint scatters recorded during previous fieldwalking (SyAC 97, 208) and located on the terrace edge of a small stream valley. The stratigraphy recorded in all trenches comprised a plough-soil above post-glacial alluvial clay and Cretaceous Gault Formation clay and pebbly sand deposits. Worked flint artefacts were only recovered from the plough-soil with no artefacts, features or deposits found cut into or within the alluvial sediments underlying it.

Nugent Close, Dunsfold

Evaluation by G Webster of ASE. Two possible features were recorded, although they were likely to be geological in origin. Tiny unstratified fragments of Late Bronze Age/Early Iron Age pottery and medieval tile were the only artefactual material recovered.

Land north of Malthouse Farm, Benner Lane, West End

Evaluation and subsequent excavation of four areas by S Wilson of COT. Evidence was revealed for a small rural settlement dating from the Middle–Late Iron Age that comprised at least two roundhouses with associated four-post structures. The site appeared to be unenclosed but ditches and trackways suggest that it was sited in a managed landscape. Charred plant assemblages indicate a rural settlement with domestic activities, including a small amount of crop processing taking place in the vicinity.

Spelthorne Fire Station, Fordbridge, Kingston Road, Ashford

Strip, map and record excavation by T Collie of SCAU, undertaken in 2016, revealed a complex, Middle–Late Bronze Age/Early Iron Age system of ditches across the east of the site. Oriented north–south/east–west and in places formed of a double ditch, it extended to the centre of the site, where the principal ditch turned west towards the river Ash. The ditches may represent a domestic enclosure, although their generally shallow nature suggests they form part of the wider Bronze Age field system known to extend across a large area of the river Thames gravels both north and south of the river.

64 The Avenue, Egham

Strip, map and record excavation by W Weller of SCAU, a continuation of the 2016 excavations (SyAC 101, 220), revealed further significant archaeological deposits. The most notable being the Roman road, the roadside ditch of which was previously excavated. Large elements of the road surface were intact, and a camber was visible in section, together with distinct layering relating to re-metalling. A section of ditch was uncovered that contained two sherds of Late Bronze Age pottery that probably date the feature.

Box Hill School, Mickleham

A watching brief by W Weller of SCAU during levelling of a sports field, recovered a small assemblage of unstratified Neolithic and Bronze Age worked flints. However, owing to the shallow nature of the groundworks, no other finds or features of archaeological interest were recorded; the archaeological horizon was not encountered.

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