17th century

155 High Street, Guildford

Building recording by V Boesso of MOLA prior to the reconstruction of a listed wall. The structure was noted to have been extensively rebuilt in the 19th century, but the oldest elements appeared contemporary with the nearby Guildford House, which dates to 1660. A subsequent watching brief by S Hoad of MOLA, carried out during the dismantling of the wall, revealed a well situated partially beneath the foundations that obviously pre-dated its construction.

15 High Street, Ewell

Watching brief during 2007 and 2008 by D Brooks of Bourne Hall Museum during refurbishment of the presumed 16th century building. The building was recorded by the DBRG as it was stripped back and its 16th century origin confirmed. The excavation of a trench for new footings within the building revealed a layer of burnt timber containing pottery of late medieval date over a mortar/chalk floor or surface, suggestive of the presence of an earlier building on the site, which had been destroyed by fire.

8 Church Street, Ewell

Watching brief by S Nelson of EEHAS during the alterations to the building and during demolition of a rear, presumed 19th century, extension. The building is a late 17th century timber-framed structure, with 18th and 19th century alterations and additions. Stripping of all internal plaster surfaces allowed details of the timber framing and sequence of development to be recorded and a previous programme of building recording be augmented.

Chatley Farm Estate, Pointers Road, Cobham

Historic building recording and watching brief by B Davis and S Beach of WA during alterations and conversion to Chatley Farmhouse and associated farm buildings. The building recording demonstrated that parts of the farmhouse date to the late 16th or early 17th centuries, and a two-bay timber-framed structure with brick chimney-stack remains fossilised within the present structure. The building was extended in the late 17th or early 18th century, and was given a major upgrade in the late 18th century, with several other farm buildings added at this time.

Priory Park, Reigate

Evaluation and excavation by J Robertson of SCAU, undertaken as part of the park regeneration programme. The area of the former tennis courts was evaluated, with evidence for the remains of a hexagonal dovecote, structural walls and a hearth being revealed. The area was thought more suitable for geophysical survey, however, and this technique was pursued here subsequently (see report below).

Clockhouse Brickworks, Capel

Monitoring of topsoil stripping by R Moore of NA in the area of two proposed haul roads did not reveal any features of archaeological significance, but did recover struck flint of Neolithic/Bronze Age date, a fragment of 17th century pot, and a small collection of modern ceramic building material.

Eastgate House, 225 High Street, Guildford

Evaluation by J Pine of TVAS revealed evidence for 13th–15th century layers, with the possibility of a cut feature of medieval date also being discovered, although this could not be confirmed. Evidence of 17th–18th century pitting activity was also revealed, followed by 19th–20th century disturbance in a relatively deep sequence that suggested continuous activity on the site for some considerable time.

192–194 High Street, Guildford

Excavation by J Pine of TVAS following evaluation in 2004. The earliest features recorded were a series of 13th–14th century pits containing an array of domestic rubbish. There appeared to be a hiatus in activity following this, with little further activity noted until a 17th century soil/rubbish horizon was revealed. Pitting then continued into the 18th and 19th centuries in a sequence of fairly typical urban backlands activity. A subsequent watching brief was undertaken during the underpinning of a boundary wall.

Nurses Cottage, Old Palace Road, Weybridge

Watching brief maintained by R Poulton of SCAU during the construction of two extensions at a property within the Scheduled area of Oatlands Palace revealed that the site had seen a considerable build-up in level (of over 1m) since the demolition of the palace in 1650. At the base of the build-up, and overlying the natural, was a layer representing debris from the palace demolition, although it is unclear what this implies with regard to the location of the site in relation to the palace.

Cherry Cottage, Dowlands Lane, Copthorne

Archaeological interpretative survey by D Martin of ASE of the cottage prior to alteration identified that all that remained of the probable original structure was the chimney stack. If re-used timbers within the first floor ceilings are an indicator, then the original date of the structure is unlikely to have been earlier than c 1700. During the second half of the 18th century, the earlier cottage was demolished apart from its chimney, and replaced by the current structure.

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