Woking

The White Hart public house, 150 High Street, Old Woking

Photographic record by C Lacey and P Wardle of The Historic Environment Consultancy and evaluation by P Jorgensen of PCA that confirmed the presence of an undisturbed medieval soil horizon across the site, as revealed in the 2011 SyAS test-pitting (SyAS 98, 257). In the central part of the site this was sealed by a layer of subsoil that produced 17th -18th century material. No features of medieval date were uncovered, but large quantities of later medieval pottery and peg tile fragments suggest a building in the vicinity.

Riverside Gardens, Old Woking

Excavation by R Savage of SyAS on an area of collapsed ground revealed only modern made-ground, with indications of repeated episodes of infilling. A test pit excavated to the north revealed recent levelling. Owing to the depth of deposits, the natural sand/gravel was not reached in either excavation.

Woking Palace, Woking

Second season of a community excavation by SyAS and SCAU, under the direction of R Poulton, of the Scheduled moated site. Two of the principal foci of the excavations were in areas where the 2009 excavations had revealed kitchen refuse dumping and 16th century brick walls. Within the former of these areas, substantial amounts of animal bone and pottery dated to the late 13th or early 14th century were sealed and preserved beneath the floors of a new range of stone buildings, erected around 1300, which seem likely to have been part of the privy lodgings.

Rosemead, High Street, Old Woking

Evaluation trenches dug by SyAS under the direction of R Savage proved the existence of substantial brick clamps as indicated by magnetometry survey in 2009; the clamps remain undated but are probably medieval. Test pits confirmed a scattered presence of Roman tiles to the east of St Peter’s church, but only one sherd of domestic Roman pottery was found (and that well-rolled and close to the surface of the field). A test pit at an adjoining property produced large stratified sherds of early 12th century pottery, co-incident with the building or rebuilding of St Peter’s church c AD 1100–20.

Woking Park and former Westfield Tip, Woking

Two phases of evaluation by S Mounce of WA in advance of flood protection, landscaping, tip remediation and redevelopment alongside the Hoe Stream. The first phase revealed a significant depth of alluvial deposits, late 19th and early 20th artefacts likely to have been washed up and deposited by the Hoe in a trench closest to the modern course of the stream, but no deposits of archaeological interest. The second phase revealed alluvial layers within all of the trenches, confirming that the site historically lay within the flood plain.

West Hall, Parvis Road, West Byfleet

Evaluation and watching brief by I Howell and historic building survey by H Robertson of MOLA. The evaluation revealed the northern and southern edges of a water feature shown on maps of 1768, 1801 and 1841, and several red brick footings which appear to have belonged to two phases of greenhouse construction. Groundworks within the area of the water feature were subject to the watching brief, but the majority of these were not deep enough to expose the cut of the feature, and it was not possible to ascertain its function.

Pyrford Marina, Lock Lane, Pyrford

Watching brief by J Lewis of TVAS during the excavation of test pits to ascertain whether the construction of extension to the marina would have the potential to impact on archaeology. The construction of the marina involves excavation to a depth of 217mm from the current ground level, and the test pits revealed the archaeologically relevant horizons at depths of below 420mm, so allowing for the preservation in situ beneath the proposed development of any deposits that may be present.

Centred, Woking Park and former Westfield Tip, Woking

Two phases of evaluation by S Mounce of WA in in advance of flood protection, landscaping, tip remediation and redevelopment alongside the Hoe Stream. The first phase revealed a significant depth of alluvial deposits, late 19th and early 20th artefacts likely to have been washed up and deposited by the Hoe in a trench closest to the modern path of the stream, but no deposits of archaeological interest. The second phase revealed alluvial layers within all of the trenches, confirming that the site historically lay within the floodplain.

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