Waverley

Forge Cottage, Thursley Road, Elstead

Watching brief by K Butler of CBAS revealed no archaeological features, although two pottery sherds dating to the Saxo-Norman period were recovered from the topsoil, suggesting possible early medieval activity on or near the site. The majority of the artefacts recovered during the watching brief were dated to the mid–late 16th century, contemporary with Forge Cottage. Other pottery recovered was of the early post-medieval period, although the largest quantity was of 19th century date.

Inval, Bunch Lane, Haslemere

Historic building assessment by M Higgins of SCC of a previously unrecognised three-unit (parlour, hall and service) medieval open-hall house, with an internal jetty at the upper end, an overshot cross-passage at the low end and a suggested date of the third quarter of the 15th century.

Town centre, Farnham

A second year of community test pitting directed by A Sassin and D Graham of SyAS. Fifteen 1m2 test pits excavated at Farnham Park, Garden Cottage and Lowndes End on Long Garden Walk, the Windsor Almshouses, 7A Castle Street, the Museum of Farnham, the Old Vicarage, and Bishops Meadow produced finds of post-medieval or Victorian date, attesting to the majority of pits being located outside the known medieval core of the town.

Brethren’s Meeting Hall, West Street, Farnham

Evaluation by T Smith of Bristol & Region Archaeological Services recovered evidence for flint-working consisting of microdebitage, including complete and broken flakes and one small exhausted pyramid core of probable Mesolithic date. Recovery patterns suggested the assemblage was evenly distributed within the gravel deposits. No knapping concentrations were evident and it is likely that any former ground surfaces were removed during later landscaping, probably in advance of the construction of the Brethren’s Hall.

Dockenfield Farm

Excavation by A and D Graham of SyAS, and the Basingstoke Archaeological and Historical Society, of a Romano-British tile kiln. The kiln was in operation during the late 3rd and early 4th centuries, based on the dating of pottery and tile cutaways, and largely producing tegulae. The excavation followed fieldwalking and a geophysical survey

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Waverley