Mesolithic

Blackdown Primary School (Portesbery School) (former), Deepcut

Evaluation by N Randall of SCAU recorded an undated pit, possibly an earth oven, and two unstratified flint cores of Mesolithic or Neolithic date. Across the centre of the site were large areas of ground disturbance that probably related to the 20th century use of the site as military barracks, and the impact of a railway line that traversed the site during the inter-war period.

Majestic House, Staines-upon-Thames

Evaluation and excavation by C Ellis of COT followed initial evaluation of the site by AOC in 2006 (SyAC 94, 368). The work revealed that large parts of the site had been subject to extensive modern disturbance but excavation in two areas revealed evidence of activity from the Mesolithic, Neolithic/Bronze Age, Iron Age, Roman, medieval and post-medieval periods. The Mesolithic was represented by residual worked flint artefacts from later features.

Lime Trees Primary School, Battlebridge Lane, Merstham

Evaluation and subsequent excavation by W Weller of SCAU produced residual Mesolithic and Neolithic flintwork and a potential Bronze Age ditch terminal. An intensive period of activity began in the Middle Iron Age and extended into the early 2nd century AD, with a series of boundary or enclosure ditches and pits dominating the excavated area. The ditches may have formed a rectangular enclosure or field boundaries associated with a central domestic enclosure of a previously, partially recorded farmstead.

Merland Rise, Tadworth

Evaluation by T Munnery of SCAU revealed residual Mesolithic and Neolithic flintwork, a number of probable Late Bronze Age/Early Iron Age ditches and medieval or post-medieval quarry/dene holes. The character of the ditches suggests they form part of a field system rather than a settlement enclosure.

South Holmwood Brickworks, Newdigate Road, Newdigate

Strip, map and sample by J Wright of COT revealed two pits and two linear features, and recovered a small quantity of probable Mesolithic flint from the top of the natural substrate. One of the pits was similar to examples investigated in an adjoining area in 2011 thought likely to be tree-throw hollows resulting from tree clearance in the Late Bronze Age or Early Iron Age. The second pit is also likely to be the remains of a tree-throw hollow but probably of recent origin.

Waitrose, South Street, Dorking

Evaluation by T Munnery of SCAU. Medieval features comprising pits, postholes, a well and a possible buried soil were revealed. Two of the features and the buried soil may be as early as the late 12th or early 13th century. A relatively large number of struck flints, mostly of Mesolithic but also Neolithic date were recovered, mostly from one location in a limited-sized test pit. Sherds of Roman and Saxon pottery recovered are likely to be residual and unlikely to indicate that significant evidence from these periods is present on the site.

Howard of Effingham School, Browns Lane, Effingham

Evaluation by S Stevens of ASE revealed a Roman gully and two further undated gullies at the northern end of the site, possibly part of a field boundary or enclosure. The presence of a humic garden soil in the north-western part of the site correlates with the area of a small enclosure depicted on late 19th and 20th century maps and suggests that this may have been used for domestic cultivation. A small assemblage of artefacts including prehistoric flintwork, medieval and post-medieval pottery and ceramic building material was recovered from the overburden.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Mesolithic